When dubstep left the underground

Originating in south London, dubstep is a type of electronic music that began to receive wide international acclaim about 10 years ago.

In 2008, photographer Georg Gatsas began to document the musicians, venues and fans of this scene as it emerged blinking from the underground.

He discovered a close-knit community, often working-class and ethnically diverse. As time went on, and the scene grew, it became less easily categorised, blending and crossing over with other genres.

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Many of the artists photographed gained exposure through Rinse, a pirate radio station founded in 1994 by a group of teenagers in Bow, east London.

Although the station’s initial focus was on jungle, it nurtured the new genres of grime, dubstep and funky, as well as the careers of Wiley, Katy B and Dizzee Rascal.

Rinse was granted a community FM broadcast licence in 2010, allowing it to operate within the law.

As part of the licence agreement, the station works to train marginalised youths in broadcasting skills, at times working with those with special educational needs and histories of truancy.

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Club night FWD was also instrumental in the development of dubstep, with many of the DJs and MCs pictured here playing there.

Sarah “Soulja” Lockhart was one of the founding members of the night, and was influential in securing Rinse’s licence.

Based in east London, FWD began in the Old Street venue Plastic People, later relocating to Dance Tunnel, further north in Dalston.

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Explaining the appeal of these club nights, captured in dramatic black and white, Gatsas says producers work with sub-bass frequencies barely perceptible on home stereo systems that can be heard on larger sound systems.

“These events dispense with lighting techniques altogether, and clubbers abandon themselves completely to the acoustic experience on a pitch-black dance floor,” he said in 2009.

“Visual aspects and club culture are secondary; the new generation of UK ravers has returned to the roots of bass culture, when it was all about music, sound and a sense of community.”

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Image copyright
Georg Gatsas

Signal the Future by Georg Gatsas is published by cpress Loose Joints.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-41982019

Mount Agung: Bali volcano eruption photos explained

Image copyright
EPA

Some of the images coming out of Mt Agung, the volcano in Bali which could be on the brink of a major eruption, have been spectacular. But the pictures also tell the story of what is going on inside, as volcanologist Janine Krippner explains.

Over the last two months Mt Agung has seen increased seismicity. This is the increased fracturing of rocks inside the volcano as magma, a volatile mixture of molten rocks, fluids and gases, moves from deep within the earth right up to the top.

In the past week we have seen thick plumes of steam and ash being belched out, as well as lava glowing at the surface of the crater, and flowing rivers of cold mud down river valleys.

Steam rising up

In most of the first pictures of the mountain two months ago, you wouldn’t have been able to tell there was an eruption brewing. That information came to us from the data within the mountain that detected its increased seismicity – and from tremors that began shaking the area.

Image copyright
BAY ISMOYO

The most you would have seen is steam rising up, which was simply the water inside the volcano heating up and coming out of its surface. The mix of volcanic ash and lava that make up the mountain is like a sponge – and in rainy Indonesia the water soaks onto it and is held there until it gets heated up.

Since then it has been relatively quiet and this is typical for a volcano. These fluctuations in activity are what makes it so hard to predict.

Dense plumes of ash

The volcano first began belching thick ash and steam last Tuesday, its first eruption in more than 50 years.

This was a phreatic eruption – the expulsion of pressurised steam from inside the volcano because the magma within is heating up water. This can lead to a build-up of pressure which causes an explosion blasting rock and bits of the crater into tiny pieces of ash.

Image copyright
AFP

The magma has been moving up from inside and it’s breaking rock as it goes along. As the magma moves up, water inside the volcano heats up, steam builds up pressure and it gets to a point where the rock just can’t hold it back any more. That is what we are seeing now.

So the magma has moved so high up the volcano there was not enough rock to hold it back, so it is being blasted into tiny pieces of ash and being spread about. Rocks, glass and crystal are flying out of the volcano.

If the eruption columns or plumes of ash are going straight up regardless of wind, it means the velocity is very high. The speed at which it comes out and the amount of ash determines how high a plume can get.

In the 1963 eruption of Mt Agung, eruptions reached as high as 26km (16 miles) above sea level.

Image copyright
Reuters

At volcanoes like Agung, the magma can travel 5-15km to the surface from deep within the earth leading to an eruption.

The orange glow of the crater

At night, the orange glow at the surface of the crater is simply incandescence because it is just so hot. The magma is at the surface, and as it reaches the surface it becomes known as lava.

One of the reason the authorities increased the alert level to four is because the magma is getting higher and higher – and these images show exactly how high it is now.

Image copyright
EPA

The volcano at sunrise

But the magma is not responsible for the spectacular images of pink and orange hues in the gas at dawn. That is simply the sunrise being reflected by the ash plume – the sun’s rays hitting the volcanic ash.

Image copyright
Reuters

Different shades of ash

You can also learn a lot from the different shades of ash that rise up from the surface of a volcano. It’s possible that pictures showing two distinct ash colours could point to two vents in the crater – one that is producing more ash and another that is producing more steam.

Image copyright
EPA

In the 1963 eruption of Mt Agung some researchers thought that it was possible there were two vents.

Dangerous rivers of mud and debris

The very latest images out of Bali point to a new development, which are volcanic mud flows – or lahars. The ash and rock depositing around the volcano when combined with rain can create dangerous fast-flowing rivers with the consistency of water up to wet concrete, and that can move and raise the river level very quickly.

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BNPB

It is not just water, they can carry debris such as boulders and trees and at the moment are something authorities are moving swiftly to warn residents about.

Janine Krippner is a volcanologist in Pittsburgh, USA.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-42133502

Week in pictures: 18-24 November 2017

Our selection of some of the most striking news photographs taken around the world this week.

Image copyright
Susana Vera / Reuters

Image caption

Rohingya refugee Almor Yhan rests with relatives hours after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border. Yhan told Reuters that she lost one son and two nephews when their village, Godam Para, was attacked by Myanmar military. More than 600,000 have fled to neighbouring Bangladesh since Rohingya attacks on police posts prompted a military crackdown in Rakhine state in late August.

Image copyright
Jane Barlow/PA

Image caption

Richard Leonard has been elected as the new leader of the Labour Party in Scotland after a bitter battle to succeed Kezia Dugdale, who resigned from the role in August.

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Mike Hutchings / Reuters

Image caption

On the eve of being sworn in as the new president of Zimbabwe, Vice-President Emmerson Mnangagwa addressed supporters in Harare. His predecessor, Robert Mugabe, left office dramatically after 37 years of authoritarian rule.

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TOMS KALNINS / EPA

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A light installation by Finnish artist Alexander Reichstein is seen at the Staro Riga Light Festival in Latvia.

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Andrew Kelly / Reuters

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People gather outside Macy’s department store in New York as they wait for the sales to begin on Black Friday, a worldwide shopping event where discounts are offered.

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Stringer / AFP

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Lebanese PM Saad Hariri arrived back in Beirut for the first time since announcing – and later “suspending” – his resignation in Saudi Arabia more than two weeks ago.

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Victoria Jones / PA

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The Prince of Wales described the destruction caused by Caribbean hurricanes as “utterly heartbreaking”. Here he visits Dominica as part of a three-day tour to see the damage caused by hurricanes Irma and Maria in September.

Image copyright
Carlos Barria / Reuters

Image caption

The Thanksgiving turkey pardoning is an annual tradition at the White House and this year was Donald Trump’s first. The tradition can be traced back to President Abraham Lincoln in 1863.

Image copyright
Charlotte Graham / REX / Shutterstock

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The LMS Jubilee Class locomotive Galatea is seen steaming past Conwy Castle in north Wales.

Image copyright
JONO SEARLE / EPA

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Cricket fans enjoy the pool deck on the first day of the first Ashes Test match between Australia and England at the Gabba in Brisbane. England’s players have a tough task ahead of them, having beaten Australia on their own turf only four times since 1954-55.

All photographs are copyrighted.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42111376

Bands, denim and leather

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Photographer Dan Giannopoulos has been a heavy metal fan for many years, regularly buying T-shirts featuring the names of his favourite bands.

Yet he says he has always felt unable to wear a battle jacket, the name for leather or denim jackets decorated with patches and stencils that often have their sleeves removed.

Although it has its roots ithe biker scene, now this item of clothing is ubiquitous at many punk and metal concerts.

So rather than wearing a jacket himself, instead Dan decided to document those who choose to do so.

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

It was his curiosity about the battle jacket’s place in metal culture that led Giannopoulos to start his project.

“The jackets are an interesting contradiction,” he says. “At once a symbol of the wearer’s unique and specific tastes,” they also give a sense of belonging within the wider metal subculture.

One metal fan, Big X, owns the above jacket featuring patches of his favourite bands such as Kiss and Def Leppard.

He says, “Owning a battle jacket to me means I like to wear my interests and influences and for it to be known that I’m part of the metal community… It has a tribal element and quality to wearing it and it shows that I belong to a particular lifestyle.”

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

The back of Beth’s jacket focuses mainly on her love of Iron Maiden, a British metal band fronted by singer Bruce Dickinson.

“I started listening to them when I was going through a very bad time, and they really helped me a lot,” she explains.

“Wearing a jacket is a paradox,” says Paul, below, who made his first jacket about five years ago. “It means being part of a tribe of people yet at the same time showing your individual tastes in music and culture.”

“At first it seemed like a very conformist approach to music, but the more I immersed myself in the underground side of the music, the more I felt the need to spread the word of the great bands I listened to.”

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

“When my big brother started taking me to gigs there were patches,” says Jim, while lighting a cigarette.

“And they were always the cheapest merchandise. And, as a 16-year-old, the only thing I could usually afford was a patch.”

Twenty-nine-year-old Sam started his first jacket at 16. The one he wears below is dedicated to English rock band Motorhead.

“Owning a battle jacket means a lot of things to a lot of people, to me it’s a symbol of the life you lead and the music you enjoy and in some respects your outlook on life.

“I myself wear my jacket simply because I love the bands that I have on it.”

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

Image copyright
Dan Giannopoulos

All images copyright Dan Giannopoulos.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-41723065

Restricted

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42098636

Mnangagwa sworn in

Zimbabwe’s new President Emmerson Mnangagwa has taken the oath of office in a packed stadium in the capital, Harare.

We take a look at pictures of the ceremony and the thousands of people gathered at the National Sports Stadium in Harare.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

The 60,000 capacity stadium was packed with Zimbabweans eager to witness the start of a new era in their country’s history

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Mr Mnangagwa’s swearing-in follows the dramatic departure of Robert Mugabe after 37 years of authoritarian rule

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Mr Mnangagwa was the former vice-president, who was dismissed earlier this month, leading the army to intervene and force Mr Mugabe to resign

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Mr Mnangagwa, who had fled the country, returned from exile on Wednesday 21 November

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Reuters

Image caption

The new president (centre, left) arrived with his wife Auxilia (centre, right).

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Reuters

Image caption

Mr Mnangagwa has been at the heart of power for 37 years

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Reuters

Image caption

Army chief General Constantino Chiwenga, the man behind the military takeover, watched the ceremony

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Reuters

Image caption

Mr Mnangagwa is associated by many with some of the worst atrocities committed under Zanu-PF

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Reuters

Image caption

In his speech, he paid tribute to his predecessor, Robert Mugabe

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Reuters

Image caption

He also promised to serve all Zimbabweans, not just members of Zanu-PF

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Reuters

Image caption

Leaders from several of Zimbabwe’s neighbours were present

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Reuters

Image caption

He is a former minister of defence, and security, and has always enjoyed close ties to the military…

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Reuters

Image caption

The military intervened and forced Mr Mugabe to resign because they wanted to prevented Grace Mugabe from taking power

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Reuters

Image caption

The crowds cheered a 21-gun salute and a flypast

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Many Zimbabweans have welcomed the military intervention to oust Mr Mugabe

All images are subject to copyright.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42110256

Flea market photo shows ‘Billy the Kid and man who shot him’

Image copyright
Frank Abrams

Image caption

Historians believe the photo shows Billy the Kid (second from left) and Pat Garrett (far right)

A photo discovered by a US lawyer at a flea market may be a rare image of Wild West outlaw Billy the Kid and could be worth millions, experts have said.

Frank Abrams bought the tintype photo in North Carolina for $10 (£7) and put it up in the guest room of his home.

He consulted experts after watching a TV programme about the discovery of another photo of Billy the Kid.

Historians told Mr Abrams his photo may show the outlaw with his future killer.

Mr Abrams, a criminal defence lawyer, bought the tintype photo – which is an image produced on a thin sheet of metal – at a flea market near the city of Asheville in 2011.

Airbnb room photo

He told BBC News he decided to have it analysed by experts at the Billy the Kid museum in New Mexico after watching a programme in 2015 about a newly found photo of the gunslinger playing croquet.

The croquet photo had been valued at around $5m.

Mr Abrams came to suspect that one of the five men pictured in his tintype image was Patrick Floyd Garrett.

Garrett and Billy the Kid were said to have been close friends until Garrett became sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico.

Sheriff Garrett is remembered for gunning down the outlaw in 1881.

Mr Abrams said his photo – which is dated 2 August 1880 – hung for several years on the wall of a spare room in his home that he rented out through Airbnb.

“If I had known it was one of the most famous photos in history, I would have charged more for the room,” he laughed.

Forensic expert

Mr Abrams enlisted Robert Stahl, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, as well as several other forensic experts, to identify whether his image did indeed show Sheriff Garrett and Billy the Kid.

William Dunniway, a tintype expert, told the New York Times the photo was probably taken between 1875-80.

Mr Dunniway worked with Los Angeles forensic video expert Kent Gibson to investigate the picture.

Mr Gibson used facial recognition software to conclude it was most likely a photo of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Garrett.

A handwriting expert in Texas compared a signature from Sheriff Garrett on the photo with 10 documents that included his handwriting.

He found a match, the Associated Press news agency reported.

Although experts say the photo may be worth millions of dollars, Mr Abrams says he is no rush to sell it.

“I’ve never put a price on it,” he said in a telephone interview with BBC News.

“My interest is in the history,” he added.

The image that experts say shows Billy the Kid playing croquet was bought in 2010 for $2 from a junk shop in Fresno, California.

You might also be interested in:

The only other authenticated portrait of the gunslinger sold for $2.3m in 2011 at an auction in Denver, Colorado.

That tintype depicts the gunfighter in rumpled clothes and a hat, gazing at the camera and holding a Winchester rifle.

The outlaw – who was born Henry McCarty but later took the alias William Bonney – was reputedly born in New York.

He is thought to have moved to Colorado with his mother and brothers when his father died.

The gunslinger fell into a career of thievery and lawlessness and was hunted across the southern US states and northern Mexico.

He is widely thought to have killed 21 people, though some sources put the figure as high as 27.

Billy the Kid was captured and sentenced to hang for the 1878 murder of a county sheriff.

He escaped, only to be hunted down and killed by Sheriff Garrett on 14 July 1881.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42089464

Flea market photo shows ‘Billy the Kid and man who shot him’

Image copyright
Frank Abrams

Image caption

Historians believe the photo shows Billy the Kid (second from left) and Pat Garrett (far right)

A photo discovered by a US lawyer at a flea market may be a rare image of Wild West outlaw Billy the Kid and could be worth millions, experts have said.

Frank Abrams bought the tintype photo in North Carolina for $10 (£7) and put it up in the guest room of his home.

He consulted experts after watching a TV programme about the discovery of another photo of Billy the Kid.

Historians told Mr Abrams his photo may show the outlaw with his future killer.

Mr Abrams, a criminal defence lawyer, bought the tintype photo – which is an image produced on a thin sheet of metal – at a flea market near the city of Asheville in 2011.

Airbnb room photo

He told BBC News he decided to have it analysed by experts at the Billy the Kid museum in New Mexico after watching a programme in 2015 about a newly found photo of the gunslinger playing croquet.

The croquet photo had been valued at around $5m.

Mr Abrams came to suspect that one of the five men pictured in his tintype image was Patrick Floyd Garrett.

Garrett and Billy the Kid were said to have been close friends until Garrett became sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico.

Sheriff Garrett is remembered for gunning down the outlaw in 1881.

Mr Abrams said his photo – which is dated 2 August 1880 – hung for several years on the wall of a spare room in his home that he rented out through Airbnb.

“If I had known it was one of the most famous photos in history, I would have charged more for the room,” he laughed.

Forensic expert

Mr Abrams enlisted Robert Stahl, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, as well as several other forensic experts, to identify whether his image did indeed show Sheriff Garrett and Billy the Kid.

William Dunniway, a tintype expert, told the New York Times the photo was probably taken between 1875-80.

Mr Dunniway worked with Los Angeles forensic video expert Kent Gibson to investigate the picture.

Mr Gibson used facial recognition software to conclude it was most likely a photo of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Garrett.

A handwriting expert in Texas compared a signature from Sheriff Garrett on the photo with 10 documents that included his handwriting.

He found a match, the Associated Press news agency reported.

Although experts say the photo may be worth millions of dollars, Mr Abrams says he is no rush to sell it.

“I’ve never put a price on it,” he said in a telephone interview with BBC News.

“My interest is in the history,” he added.

The image that experts say shows Billy the Kid playing croquet was bought in 2010 for $2 from a junk shop in Fresno, California.

You might also be interested in:

The only other authenticated portrait of the gunslinger sold for $2.3m in 2011 at an auction in Denver, Colorado.

That tintype depicts the gunfighter in rumpled clothes and a hat, gazing at the camera and holding a Winchester rifle.

The outlaw – who was born Henry McCarty but later took the alias William Bonney – was reputedly born in New York.

He is thought to have moved to Colorado with his mother and brothers when his father died.

The gunslinger fell into a career of thievery and lawlessness and was hunted across the southern US states and northern Mexico.

He is widely thought to have killed 21 people, though some sources put the figure as high as 27.

Billy the Kid was captured and sentenced to hang for the 1878 murder of a county sheriff.

He escaped, only to be hunted down and killed by Sheriff Garrett on 14 July 1881.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42089464

Africa’s top shots: 17-23 November 2017

A selection of this week’s best photos of Africans and Africa.

Image copyright
AFP

In a dress made from seed pods, Miss Tanzania Lilian Ericaah Maraule prepares backstage to represent the best of her nation’s culture at The National Costume Show in Las Vegas on Saturday.

Image copyright
AFP

On the same day in Kenya, women from the Maasai ethnic group wear their costumes for a performance to promote peace and community cohesion in the Rift Valley region.

Image copyright
EPA

The focus of these young girls is on education, as they attend school with their chalkboards in Ivory Coast’s main city, Abidjan on Friday…

Image copyright
AFP

Elsewhere in the city, a weaver works on a loom…

Image copyright
AFP

While visitors look at a display of cotton at an agriculture and animal resources exhibition. Ivory Coast is a leading cotton producer…

Image copyright
AFP

Rams from neighbouring Mali were also on show at the annual exhibition, which aims to improve farming methods and promote trade.

Image copyright
EPA

On Wednesday, a bicycle rider carries a wood rack full of bread on his head as he does deliveries in Egypt’s capital, Cairo.

Image copyright
Reuters

Workers sew clothes at a textile factory in south Ethiopia’s Hawassa Industrial Park on Friday. The clothes are for some of the world’s leading fashion companies.

Image copyright
AFP

In Kenya’s capital Nairobi on Monday, a man holds a placard of President Uhuru Kenyatta after a court upheld his victory in last month’s highly divisive presidential election re-run, paving the way for him to be sworn in next week for a second term.

Image copyright
AFP

In Zimbabwe’s capital Harare on Saturday, women take selfies with soldiers to celebrate the military’s decision to put President Robert Mugabe, 93, under house arrest, and to demand his resignation…

Image copyright
AFP

On Tuesday, crowds gathered outside parliament to show support for MPs who had initiated impeachments proceedings against the 93-year-old ruler…

Image copyright
Reuters

When he resigned a short while later, celebrations broke out among Zimbabweans around the world, including in neighbouring South Africa where they burnt banners bearing his image…

Image copyright
Reuters

The next day in Harare, this man carried a cuddly crocodile to welcome the next President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who is nicknamed “the crocodile” because of his reputation for being politically cunning.

Image copyright
AFP

In Tunisia, the mood is very different on Tuesday, as mourners attend the funeral of fashion designer Azzedine Alaia, who died aged 77…

Image copyright
AFP

Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi was among the high-profile mourners who prayed for her as she was buried at cemetery in the capital Tunis.

Image copyright
EPA

In South Africa’s Cape Town on Saturday, a bee flies next to a lavender bush. Bee colonies are under stress following the American foulbrood disease outbreak in 2015, which killed about 40% of bees in the Western Cape region.

Images courtesy of AFP, EPA, PA and Reuters

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42099244

Africa’s top shots: 17-23 November 2017

A selection of this week’s best photos of Africans and Africa.

Image copyright
AFP

In a dress made from seed pods, Miss Tanzania Lilian Ericaah Maraule prepares backstage to represent the best of her nation’s culture at The National Costume Show in Las Vegas on Saturday.

Image copyright
AFP

On the same day in Kenya, women from the Maasai ethnic group wear their costumes for a performance to promote peace and community cohesion in the Rift Valley region.

Image copyright
EPA

The focus of these young girls is on education, as they attend school with their chalkboards in Ivory Coast’s main city, Abidjan on Friday…

Image copyright
AFP

Elsewhere in the city, a weaver works on a loom…

Image copyright
AFP

While visitors look at a display of cotton at an agriculture and animal resources exhibition. Ivory Coast is a leading cotton producer…

Image copyright
AFP

Rams from neighbouring Mali were also on show at the annual exhibition, which aims to improve farming methods and promote trade.

Image copyright
EPA

On Wednesday, a bicycle rider carries a wood rack full of bread on his head as he does deliveries in Egypt’s capital, Cairo.

Image copyright
Reuters

Workers sew clothes at a textile factory in south Ethiopia’s Hawassa Industrial Park on Friday. The clothes are for some of the world’s leading fashion companies.

Image copyright
AFP

In Kenya’s capital Nairobi on Monday, a man holds a placard of President Uhuru Kenyatta after a court upheld his victory in last month’s highly divisive presidential election re-run, paving the way for him to be sworn in next week for a second term.

Image copyright
AFP

In Zimbabwe’s capital Harare on Saturday, women take selfies with soldiers to celebrate the military’s decision to put President Robert Mugabe, 93, under house arrest, and to demand his resignation…

Image copyright
AFP

On Tuesday, crowds gathered outside parliament to show support for MPs who had initiated impeachments proceedings against the 93-year-old ruler…

Image copyright
Reuters

When he resigned a short while later, celebrations broke out among Zimbabweans around the world, including in neighbouring South Africa where they burnt banners bearing his image…

Image copyright
Reuters

The next day in Harare, this man carried a cuddly crocodile to welcome the next President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who is nicknamed “the crocodile” because of his reputation for being politically cunning.

Image copyright
AFP

In Tunisia, the mood is very different on Tuesday, as mourners attend the funeral of fashion designer Azzedine Alaia, who died aged 77…

Image copyright
AFP

Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi was among the high-profile mourners who prayed for her as she was buried at cemetery in the capital Tunis.

Image copyright
EPA

In South Africa’s Cape Town on Saturday, a bee flies next to a lavender bush. Bee colonies are under stress following the American foulbrood disease outbreak in 2015, which killed about 40% of bees in the Western Cape region.

Images courtesy of AFP, EPA, PA and Reuters

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42099244