Flea market photo shows ‘Billy the Kid and man who shot him’

Image copyright
Frank Abrams

Image caption

Historians believe the photo shows Billy the Kid (second from left) and Pat Garrett (far right)

A photo discovered by a US lawyer at a flea market may be a rare image of Wild West outlaw Billy the Kid and could be worth millions, experts have said.

Frank Abrams bought the tintype photo in North Carolina for $10 (£7) and put it up in the guest room of his home.

He consulted experts after watching a TV programme about the discovery of another photo of Billy the Kid.

Historians told Mr Abrams his photo may show the outlaw with his future killer.

Mr Abrams, a criminal defence lawyer, bought the tintype photo – which is an image produced on a thin sheet of metal – at a flea market near the city of Asheville in 2011.

Airbnb room photo

He told BBC News he decided to have it analysed by experts at the Billy the Kid museum in New Mexico after watching a programme in 2015 about a newly found photo of the gunslinger playing croquet.

The croquet photo had been valued at around $5m.

Mr Abrams came to suspect that one of the five men pictured in his tintype image was Patrick Floyd Garrett.

Garrett and Billy the Kid were said to have been close friends until Garrett became sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico.

Sheriff Garrett is remembered for gunning down the outlaw in 1881.

Mr Abrams said his photo – which is dated 2 August 1880 – hung for several years on the wall of a spare room in his home that he rented out through Airbnb.

“If I had known it was one of the most famous photos in history, I would have charged more for the room,” he laughed.

Forensic expert

Mr Abrams enlisted Robert Stahl, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, as well as several other forensic experts, to identify whether his image did indeed show Sheriff Garrett and Billy the Kid.

William Dunniway, a tintype expert, told the New York Times the photo was probably taken between 1875-80.

Mr Dunniway worked with Los Angeles forensic video expert Kent Gibson to investigate the picture.

Mr Gibson used facial recognition software to conclude it was most likely a photo of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Garrett.

A handwriting expert in Texas compared a signature from Sheriff Garrett on the photo with 10 documents that included his handwriting.

He found a match, the Associated Press news agency reported.

Although experts say the photo may be worth millions of dollars, Mr Abrams says he is no rush to sell it.

“I’ve never put a price on it,” he said in a telephone interview with BBC News.

“My interest is in the history,” he added.

The image that experts say shows Billy the Kid playing croquet was bought in 2010 for $2 from a junk shop in Fresno, California.

You might also be interested in:

The only other authenticated portrait of the gunslinger sold for $2.3m in 2011 at an auction in Denver, Colorado.

That tintype depicts the gunfighter in rumpled clothes and a hat, gazing at the camera and holding a Winchester rifle.

The outlaw – who was born Henry McCarty but later took the alias William Bonney – was reputedly born in New York.

He is thought to have moved to Colorado with his mother and brothers when his father died.

The gunslinger fell into a career of thievery and lawlessness and was hunted across the southern US states and northern Mexico.

He is widely thought to have killed 21 people, though some sources put the figure as high as 27.

Billy the Kid was captured and sentenced to hang for the 1878 murder of a county sheriff.

He escaped, only to be hunted down and killed by Sheriff Garrett on 14 July 1881.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42089464

Flea market photo shows ‘Billy the Kid and man who shot him’

Image copyright
Frank Abrams

Image caption

Historians believe the photo shows Billy the Kid (second from left) and Pat Garrett (far right)

A photo discovered by a US lawyer at a flea market may be a rare image of Wild West outlaw Billy the Kid and could be worth millions, experts have said.

Frank Abrams bought the tintype photo in North Carolina for $10 (£7) and put it up in the guest room of his home.

He consulted experts after watching a TV programme about the discovery of another photo of Billy the Kid.

Historians told Mr Abrams his photo may show the outlaw with his future killer.

Mr Abrams, a criminal defence lawyer, bought the tintype photo – which is an image produced on a thin sheet of metal – at a flea market near the city of Asheville in 2011.

Airbnb room photo

He told BBC News he decided to have it analysed by experts at the Billy the Kid museum in New Mexico after watching a programme in 2015 about a newly found photo of the gunslinger playing croquet.

The croquet photo had been valued at around $5m.

Mr Abrams came to suspect that one of the five men pictured in his tintype image was Patrick Floyd Garrett.

Garrett and Billy the Kid were said to have been close friends until Garrett became sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico.

Sheriff Garrett is remembered for gunning down the outlaw in 1881.

Mr Abrams said his photo – which is dated 2 August 1880 – hung for several years on the wall of a spare room in his home that he rented out through Airbnb.

“If I had known it was one of the most famous photos in history, I would have charged more for the room,” he laughed.

Forensic expert

Mr Abrams enlisted Robert Stahl, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, as well as several other forensic experts, to identify whether his image did indeed show Sheriff Garrett and Billy the Kid.

William Dunniway, a tintype expert, told the New York Times the photo was probably taken between 1875-80.

Mr Dunniway worked with Los Angeles forensic video expert Kent Gibson to investigate the picture.

Mr Gibson used facial recognition software to conclude it was most likely a photo of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Garrett.

A handwriting expert in Texas compared a signature from Sheriff Garrett on the photo with 10 documents that included his handwriting.

He found a match, the Associated Press news agency reported.

Although experts say the photo may be worth millions of dollars, Mr Abrams says he is no rush to sell it.

“I’ve never put a price on it,” he said in a telephone interview with BBC News.

“My interest is in the history,” he added.

The image that experts say shows Billy the Kid playing croquet was bought in 2010 for $2 from a junk shop in Fresno, California.

You might also be interested in:

The only other authenticated portrait of the gunslinger sold for $2.3m in 2011 at an auction in Denver, Colorado.

That tintype depicts the gunfighter in rumpled clothes and a hat, gazing at the camera and holding a Winchester rifle.

The outlaw – who was born Henry McCarty but later took the alias William Bonney – was reputedly born in New York.

He is thought to have moved to Colorado with his mother and brothers when his father died.

The gunslinger fell into a career of thievery and lawlessness and was hunted across the southern US states and northern Mexico.

He is widely thought to have killed 21 people, though some sources put the figure as high as 27.

Billy the Kid was captured and sentenced to hang for the 1878 murder of a county sheriff.

He escaped, only to be hunted down and killed by Sheriff Garrett on 14 July 1881.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42089464

Africa’s top shots: 17-23 November 2017

A selection of this week’s best photos of Africans and Africa.

Image copyright
AFP

In a dress made from seed pods, Miss Tanzania Lilian Ericaah Maraule prepares backstage to represent the best of her nation’s culture at The National Costume Show in Las Vegas on Saturday.

Image copyright
AFP

On the same day in Kenya, women from the Maasai ethnic group wear their costumes for a performance to promote peace and community cohesion in the Rift Valley region.

Image copyright
EPA

The focus of these young girls is on education, as they attend school with their chalkboards in Ivory Coast’s main city, Abidjan on Friday…

Image copyright
AFP

Elsewhere in the city, a weaver works on a loom…

Image copyright
AFP

While visitors look at a display of cotton at an agriculture and animal resources exhibition. Ivory Coast is a leading cotton producer…

Image copyright
AFP

Rams from neighbouring Mali were also on show at the annual exhibition, which aims to improve farming methods and promote trade.

Image copyright
EPA

On Wednesday, a bicycle rider carries a wood rack full of bread on his head as he does deliveries in Egypt’s capital, Cairo.

Image copyright
Reuters

Workers sew clothes at a textile factory in south Ethiopia’s Hawassa Industrial Park on Friday. The clothes are for some of the world’s leading fashion companies.

Image copyright
AFP

In Kenya’s capital Nairobi on Monday, a man holds a placard of President Uhuru Kenyatta after a court upheld his victory in last month’s highly divisive presidential election re-run, paving the way for him to be sworn in next week for a second term.

Image copyright
AFP

In Zimbabwe’s capital Harare on Saturday, women take selfies with soldiers to celebrate the military’s decision to put President Robert Mugabe, 93, under house arrest, and to demand his resignation…

Image copyright
AFP

On Tuesday, crowds gathered outside parliament to show support for MPs who had initiated impeachments proceedings against the 93-year-old ruler…

Image copyright
Reuters

When he resigned a short while later, celebrations broke out among Zimbabweans around the world, including in neighbouring South Africa where they burnt banners bearing his image…

Image copyright
Reuters

The next day in Harare, this man carried a cuddly crocodile to welcome the next President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who is nicknamed “the crocodile” because of his reputation for being politically cunning.

Image copyright
AFP

In Tunisia, the mood is very different on Tuesday, as mourners attend the funeral of fashion designer Azzedine Alaia, who died aged 77…

Image copyright
AFP

Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi was among the high-profile mourners who prayed for her as she was buried at cemetery in the capital Tunis.

Image copyright
EPA

In South Africa’s Cape Town on Saturday, a bee flies next to a lavender bush. Bee colonies are under stress following the American foulbrood disease outbreak in 2015, which killed about 40% of bees in the Western Cape region.

Images courtesy of AFP, EPA, PA and Reuters

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42099244

Africa’s top shots: 17-23 November 2017

A selection of this week’s best photos of Africans and Africa.

Image copyright
AFP

In a dress made from seed pods, Miss Tanzania Lilian Ericaah Maraule prepares backstage to represent the best of her nation’s culture at The National Costume Show in Las Vegas on Saturday.

Image copyright
AFP

On the same day in Kenya, women from the Maasai ethnic group wear their costumes for a performance to promote peace and community cohesion in the Rift Valley region.

Image copyright
EPA

The focus of these young girls is on education, as they attend school with their chalkboards in Ivory Coast’s main city, Abidjan on Friday…

Image copyright
AFP

Elsewhere in the city, a weaver works on a loom…

Image copyright
AFP

While visitors look at a display of cotton at an agriculture and animal resources exhibition. Ivory Coast is a leading cotton producer…

Image copyright
AFP

Rams from neighbouring Mali were also on show at the annual exhibition, which aims to improve farming methods and promote trade.

Image copyright
EPA

On Wednesday, a bicycle rider carries a wood rack full of bread on his head as he does deliveries in Egypt’s capital, Cairo.

Image copyright
Reuters

Workers sew clothes at a textile factory in south Ethiopia’s Hawassa Industrial Park on Friday. The clothes are for some of the world’s leading fashion companies.

Image copyright
AFP

In Kenya’s capital Nairobi on Monday, a man holds a placard of President Uhuru Kenyatta after a court upheld his victory in last month’s highly divisive presidential election re-run, paving the way for him to be sworn in next week for a second term.

Image copyright
AFP

In Zimbabwe’s capital Harare on Saturday, women take selfies with soldiers to celebrate the military’s decision to put President Robert Mugabe, 93, under house arrest, and to demand his resignation…

Image copyright
AFP

On Tuesday, crowds gathered outside parliament to show support for MPs who had initiated impeachments proceedings against the 93-year-old ruler…

Image copyright
Reuters

When he resigned a short while later, celebrations broke out among Zimbabweans around the world, including in neighbouring South Africa where they burnt banners bearing his image…

Image copyright
Reuters

The next day in Harare, this man carried a cuddly crocodile to welcome the next President, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who is nicknamed “the crocodile” because of his reputation for being politically cunning.

Image copyright
AFP

In Tunisia, the mood is very different on Tuesday, as mourners attend the funeral of fashion designer Azzedine Alaia, who died aged 77…

Image copyright
AFP

Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi was among the high-profile mourners who prayed for her as she was buried at cemetery in the capital Tunis.

Image copyright
EPA

In South Africa’s Cape Town on Saturday, a bee flies next to a lavender bush. Bee colonies are under stress following the American foulbrood disease outbreak in 2015, which killed about 40% of bees in the Western Cape region.

Images courtesy of AFP, EPA, PA and Reuters

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42099244

Life on London’s first Aids ward

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Opened in 1987 by Diana, Princess of Wales, the Broderip, at the Middlesex Hospital, was the first Aids ward in London.

In a time before antiretroviral medications, it was populated by patients, often young men, facing a life cut brutally – and painfully – short.

Six years later, Gideon Mendel spent time documenting the lives of four patients of the Middlesex’s Broderip and neighbouring Charles Bell wards – John, Steven, Ian and Andre.

Mendel overrode the contemporary stigma surrounding HIV to take tender portraits of partners, friends and family comforting their loved ones.

All of his subjects died in the year after these portraits were taken.

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Mendel’s project aimed to move away from the representations in the popular media at the time, which he believes tended to show the horror of the illness.

“The work is gentle and compassionate and loving, and the intention was to try and move away of images of people living with HIV as being emaciated, dying skeletons,” he says.

“I was trying to show relationships and show the love.”

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Touch was an essential element of care on the ward, and Mendel captures the tactility of the nurses with their patients.

One image shows a nurse, Sarah, visiting Steven and his bird at home. The pair had developed a close bond during Steven’s time on the ward.

After the project ended, Sarah became Mendel’s partner and they have been together since.

Mendel believes he captured the compassionate energy of the ward most fully in his image of John and Michael lying together on the bed.

“For me, it’s such an amazingly intimate picture in the anonymous context of the hospital ward,” he says.

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

The Ward by Gideon Mendel is published by Trolley Books. A selection of photographs can be seen on display at the Fitzrovia Chapel, London on Wednesdays and Sundays until 3 December.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-41930950

Life on London’s first Aids ward

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Opened in 1987 by Diana, Princess of Wales, the Broderip, at the Middlesex Hospital, was the first Aids ward in London.

In a time before antiretroviral medications, it was populated by patients, often young men, facing a life cut brutally – and painfully – short.

Six years later, Gideon Mendel spent time documenting the lives of four patients of the Middlesex’s Broderip and neighbouring Charles Bell wards – John, Steven, Ian and Andre.

Mendel overrode the contemporary stigma surrounding HIV to take tender portraits of partners, friends and family comforting their loved ones.

All of his subjects died in the year after these portraits were taken.

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Mendel’s project aimed to move away from the representations in the popular media at the time, which he believes tended to show the horror of the illness.

“The work is gentle and compassionate and loving, and the intention was to try and move away of images of people living with HIV as being emaciated, dying skeletons,” he says.

“I was trying to show relationships and show the love.”

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Touch was an essential element of care on the ward, and Mendel captures the tactility of the nurses with their patients.

One image shows a nurse, Sarah, visiting Steven and his bird at home. The pair had developed a close bond during Steven’s time on the ward.

After the project ended, Sarah became Mendel’s partner and they have been together since.

Mendel believes he captured the compassionate energy of the ward most fully in his image of John and Michael lying together on the bed.

“For me, it’s such an amazingly intimate picture in the anonymous context of the hospital ward,” he says.

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

Image copyright
Gideon Mendel

The Ward by Gideon Mendel is published by Trolley Books. A selection of photographs can be seen on display at the Fitzrovia Chapel, London on Wednesdays and Sundays until 3 December.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-41930950