Buildings on film

Twelve finalists have been chosen from this year’s Art of Building architectural photography competition. From abstract details to abandoned buildings, here are the chosen images.

Image copyright
MEHMET YASA

Image caption

Mehmet Yasa’s photograph is called “the eye of the tower” due to his ingenious positioning of the staircase and bell in this tower in Verona, Italy.

Image copyright
Hanqing Qu

Image caption

Hanqing Qu’s image was taken at Malaysia’s National Mosque. “When the sunlight sprinkles into this building, light and shade meet each other in a dreamlike scene,” he says. “It reminds me of the film called Inception.”

Image copyright
Hans Wichmann

Image caption

Taken at the Cultural Centre in Aviles, northern Spain, Hans Wichmann documents a young cyclist. He calls the museum “a successful integration of modern buildings in an old industrial site by architect Oscar Niemeyer, a place for large and small people”.

Image copyright
FRANCIS MESLET

Image caption

Francis Meslet chose to look upwards in this picture, taken in a French memorial marking the centenary of World War One.

Image copyright
Linda van Slobbe

Image caption

“This historic theatre is built in a typical oval shape, with the stage on one end and multiple floors and balconies all around the rest,” says photographer Linda van Slobbe about this theatre in Bar-le-Duc, France. “This one has beautiful decorations.”

Image copyright
Robert Cassway

Image caption

This image by Robert Cassway is part of a larger series called “The Vanishing West” about Fresno, Montana, USA. “This photo shows the ravages of time and weather on a building that was left to decay by benign neglect, after the families that lived in Fresno moved away,” he says.

Image copyright
Andrean Hadhianto Kwee

Image caption

The St Andrew’s Cathedral Tower is a neo-Gothic building built in mid-19th Century Singapore. Andrean Hadhianto Kwee says it stands “majestically in its surroundings, where it has still preserved its originality”.

Image copyright
Petr Starov

Image caption

Cemetery of the 21st Century is the title of Petr Starov’s image shot in Ryazan, Russia. The photo captures the suspended construction of a shopping centre.

Image copyright
Guo Ji Hua

Image caption

Guo Ji Hua’s image of these roads in Guangdong, China, is titled Cross Bridge Waltz and was shot using a drone. “The intersection of this work has an abstract line of beauty,” he says.

Image copyright
Dmytro Levchuk

Image caption

Another photographer, Dmytro Levchuk, also chose to look upwards in this representation of bold colours and form in Dubai.

Image copyright
Hossein Younesi

Image caption

Hossein Younesi captures the experimental architectural forms of this modern residential building in Iran.

Image copyright
Gautam Kamat Bambolkar

Image caption

“Rugged textured cable pipes ran over my head at a train station in New York, creating a trance-like, frightful pattern,” says Gautam Kamat Bambolkar. “They ran from the edge of the entrance to an infinite end. It looked nothing less than a scary man-made cave.”

The Art of Building is run by the Chartered Institute of Building.

You might also be interested in:

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42227931

Caravan of hope

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Every year for the past 13 years, a group of women have travelled 4,000km (2,485 miles) across Mexico searching for their children who went missing while migrating through the country from Central America. Photojournalist Encarni Pindado has spoken to some of the women about their plight and what they aim to achieve with their Caravan of Mothers of Missing Migrants.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

The caravan brings together mothers from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.

They cross the border between Guatemala and Mexico on inflatable rafts to symbolise the risks the migrants face when crossing into Mexico.

They then travel together across Mexico in search of their relatives who disappeared.

In the 13 years since the caravan was first organised by the Mesoamerican Migrant Movement, 270 missing migrants have been located.

Part of the idea behind the caravan is also to denounce and highlight the issue of disappearances of migrants in transit through Mexico.

Of the 270 missing migrants who have been found, 90% are men. Women are much harder to find, especially when they have been forced into the sex trade. In order to boost their chances of finding those women, the movement has forged links with organisations run by sex workers.

They place pictures of the missing migrants in brothels in the hope someone will recognise their loved ones.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Clementina Murcia González has been part of the mothers’ caravan for the last five years. Two of her sons went missing: Jorge in 1984 and Mauricio in 2001.

With the help of a a local radio station, Radio Progresso, she recently managed to track down Mauricio and will be reunited with him in the Mexican city of Guadalajara as part of this year’s caravan.

“Sixteen kisses and 16 hugs is all I want from my son,” she says about the impending reunion.

Her search for Jorge continues.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Edit Gutierrez’s son left Honduras twice.

The first time he was kidnapped by Mexico’s infamous drugs cartel, the Zetas, and witnessed how they killed and burned some of the other migrants he had travelled with.

The army eventually rescued him and deported him back to Honduras.

In August 2012, he left Honduras for the second time, paying a people smuggler $3,000 (£2,250) to reach Reynosa, in the north of Mexico.

There he lost all communication with his family.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Isidora de Jesus Zuniga Colindres from Honduras is searching for her son Josue Ildefonso Molinas Zuniga.

Josue last called from the US-Mexican border town of Nuevo Laredo on 15 December, 2013.

He was headed to New York to join his father, who had received temporary protected status in the US years earlier, while his mother stayed behind in Honduras.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

María Clementina Vásquez Hernández is from Honduras. She is looking for her daughter María Ines who emigrated in 2002, leaving behind her infant son.

María Clementina has been raising her grandson in María Ines’s absence.

“I’m not even sure what her face looks like now,” she says about her daughter.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

María Elena Larios has been looking for her son Heriberto, who disappeared on 6 March, 2010.

He left La Libertad in El Salvador, to find work in the United States, but as far as María Elena knows, he never made it.

In the southern Mexican town of Huixtla people tell her to look for her son at a Christian CD stand along the train tracks.

But when she arrives, she finds a slender young man from Honduras who resembles the photograph she carries of her Heriberto but who is not her son.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Pilar Escobar Medina from Honduras is searching for her daughter Olga, with whom she has had only very intermittent contact.

One day in September 2009, Olga did not return to her home in Honduras.

Fifteen days later she called her mother from the city of Tapachula on the Guatemala-Mexico border, saying she had “ended up there”.

Ms Escobar did not hear from her again until earlier this year, when they planned a reunion. But in the months before they were due to meet, Olga’s phone line went dead.

“Before migrants died of thirst, or were bitten by a snake while crossing the desert. Today they die at the hands of organised crime, and our girls, are raped by [people linked to] organised crime” says Rosa Nelly Santos, who heads a committee for disappeared migrants in Honduras.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Mercedes Lemus (left) is searching for her daughter Ana Victoria, who went disappeared on 16 April, 2010.

Last year, a woman in Huixtla told her that she had seen her daughter in a local bar.

Neighbours confirmed that the picture of Ana Victoria resembled a woman they had seen around town with the bar’s owner.

But when Mercedes asked for permission to enter the bar, the bouncer warned her that if she went in, she would not come out alive.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

Along the way, the caravan meets local communities. In La Ceiba, a cultural and educational centre working with indigenous communities in Chiapas, the mothers are invited to a Mayan ceremony, a pre-hispanic ritual to connect with ancestors.

Image copyright
Encarni Pindado

All photographs by Encarni Pindado.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-42357009

Capturing East Harlem in the 80s

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

The New York neighbourhood of East Harlem, or El Barrio, has long been the home of many of the city’s Latino population.

Journalist Ed Morales describes it as the place “where hip-hop and salsa trumps classical, prime real estate gives way to inner city”.

Joseph Rodriguez’s photographs from the 1980s capture the vibrancy of the area’s communities, while providing glimpses into the darker undercurrents of social issues such as drug addiction, poverty and homelessness.

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

These images were born out of a collaborative university project in which Rodriguez and his fellow students attempted to protect the tenants of buildings in the neighbourhood that were threatened with gentrification.

Under their tutor, the writer and curator Fred Ritchin, the students made black-and-white photographs for court cases showing how landlords had let residential buildings deteriorate so that they could be renovated and then rented to wealthier outsiders.

After the project ended, Rodriguez stayed with the communities, shooting their lives in colour, capturing their richness.

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

“There is an enormous amount of love in these photographs. And pain. And pride. And resiliency. And a sense that things can get better,” Ritchin says about his students’ images.

Rodriguez captures the everyday life of the neighbourhood. Groups of young men sit on a stoop listening to a boombox or children play in a paddling pool. Another boy emerges from Jefferson Pool, where many families from El Barrio visited in the summer.

“This was a very hard, very poor, very tough block at the time,” he remembers about this photograph, “but what’s important to me is the sense of dignity that these boys have by putting on a suit.

“The boy on the left can’t even afford a tie but he still wears a suit. This is where I started to understand what the word ‘respect’ means to people.”

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Image copyright
Joseph Rodriguez

Spanish Harlem: El Barrio in the ’80s by Joseph Rodriguez is published by powerHouse Books.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42238503