‘I miss school to fetch clean water’

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

Mario Macilau was 23 in 2007 when he swapped his mother’s mobile phone for a Nikon camera. Photography wasn’t new to him, however, as he had been taking pictures of daily life in his home town in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique, since he was 14 years old.

His subjects ranged from the street children who squat in Maputo’s empty buildings to workers in the country’s cement industry. Now, he has turned his camera to the subject of water.

These pictures, taken towards the end of 2017, were taken in collaboration with WaterAid for the Untapped appeal which runs until the end of January. Over the next three years Macilau will record the monumental changes brought by the introduction of clean water and toilets to communities in the Cuamba district of Mozambique.

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

Josefina (above) and Eudicia, both 12 years old, have to miss school up to four times a week in order to collect water.

They walk to the Rio Naranja, a stream running off the Muassi river, which is the main source of water for inhabitants of Muassi village.

The stream is stagnant and the water the girls collect is milky in colour, says Macilau.

According to WaterAid, globally about one in nine children does not have clean water close to home, and one in three does not have a decent toilet.

Every day, almost 800 children under the age of five die from diarrheal diseases caused by dirty water and poor sanitation.

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

During the rainy season, the River Lurio becomes unusable as a source of drinking water because the surrounding dirt and excrement gets washed into it.

In M’mele village, a mud-brick house was destroyed by heavy rainfall and flooding three years ago.

And the village leader says people are moving away due to problems with the water supply.

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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Macilau’s image of an elderly farmer has been overlaid on to another picture of a puddle of murky water

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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Angelina with her daughter Irene in Sosina Masel

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WaterAid/ Mario Macilau

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Elisa Piassone and Zaida walk along the road between M’mele and Kimar as they deliver a bundle of maize flour

All images copyright WaterAid and Mario Macilau.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42567158

Africa’s week in pictures: 5

A selection of the best photos from across Africa and of Africans elsewhere in the world this week.

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AFP

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On Friday, a girl walks past the remains of homes destroyed overnight by a deadly landslide in a poor neighbourhood of Kinshasa. Flooding is a major peril for residents of DR Congo’s capital because many homes are built on hillsides where lack of drainage makes them vulnerable to flash floods

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AFP

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On the same day, a Sudanese man leaves a bakery with a bag of bread in the capital Khartoum

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AFP

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Bread prices in Sudan have doubled after the government scrapped flour subsidies, and police have cracked down on student protests against higher prices

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Reuters

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Also on Friday, horses are spotted in a misty forest close to the ruins of the Greek and Roman city in Shahhat, Libya

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Reuters

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In neighbouring Algeria, a man looks at a snow-covered slope at Ain Sefra on Sunday. It is the second time in three years that snow has been seen in the Sahara desert

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AFP

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On Wednesday, a shopper in central Nairobi considers the array of Chinese-made shoes on sale

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AFP

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A Moroccan man cuts a solitary figures as walks along the coast during a storm in the capital Rabat on Monday. The country has experienced an unusually cold snap over the last few days

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AFP

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Dozens of baby turtles await their release into the Atlantic Ocean in Benin…

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AFP

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… as conservation activists mark the National Day of Sea Turtles

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Science Photo Library

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Survival rates are low for hatchlings, with only a small percentage reaching adulthood like this green sea turtle pictured in the Red Sea off the coast of Egypt a day later

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AFP

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Pope Tawadros II, the leader of Egypt’s Coptic church, leads congruents in Christmas Eve Mass on Saturday. Unlike many other Christians who celebrate Christmas on 25 December, Egyptians Copts mark it on 7 January

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Reuters

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Ethiopian Orthodox Christians also celebrate Christmas on 7 January. Here, a pilgrim is seen reading the Bible by candlelight at a church in the northern town of Lalibela

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Reuters

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The day before, pilgrims file out of morning prayers at the Bete Amanuel, “House of Emmanuel” monolithic orthodox church in the same town

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AFP

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On Friday, a Somali fisherman carries his catch – a hammerhead shark – to Hamarweyne fish market near the port in Mogadishu

Images courtesy of AFP, Reuters and Science Photo Library

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42648498

Week in pictures: 6

Our selection of some of the most striking news photographs taken around the world this week.

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Lucy Nicholson/ Reuters

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Laura Dern, Nicole Kidman, Zoe Kravitz, Reese Witherspoon and Shailene Woodley kiss the Golden Globes they won for the show Big Little Lies. The ceremony was the first major awards since the Hollywood sexual harassment scandals, and many stars wore black to draw attention to the need for equality.

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Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock

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A girl stands with a camel at a fair in Inner Mongolia. At this local festival there are camel races and beauty contests, with more than 200 camels participating.

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Adnan Abidi/ Reuters

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Women motorcycle riders from India’s Border Security Force, the Daredevils, rehearse for the Republic Day parade on a cold winter morning in New Delhi.

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The Duchess of Cambridge

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Princess Charlotte sits on the steps of Kensington Palace in this photograph taken by her mother, the Duchess of Cambridge, to mark her first day of nursery in Kensington, London.

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ABDULMONAM EASSA/ AFP

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Two Syrian sisters run across rubble to embrace after finding each other alive following an air strike on Hamouria, in the besieged rebel-held area near Damascus. Air strikes and artillery fire killed dozens of civilians.

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HOLGER HOLLEMANN/ AFP

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A freshwater stingray is measured during the annual inventory at the Sea Life Aquarium in Hanover, northern Germany.

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Tiksa Negeri/ Reuters

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Ethiopian Orthodox pilgrims attend Christmas Eve celebrations in Bete Mariam church in Lalibela. Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas on 7 January because they use the old Julian calendar.

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Kirsty O’Connor/ PA

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On the second anniversary of David Bowie’s death, a woman lays a rose at a mural of him in Brixton, his London birthplace.

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CLODAGH KILCOYNE/ Reuters

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A cyclist finds a way through heavy fog in Dublin, Ireland. The adverse weather led to several flights being cancelled.

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Kim Hong-Ji/ Reuters

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At the Hwacheon Sancheoneo Ice Festival, just south of the demilitarised zone separating the two Koreas, a boy celebrates after catching a trout.

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Victoria Jones/ PA

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A Cornish Crabber sailing boat is polished at the London Boat Show in Docklands, east London.

All photographs are copyrighted.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-42662696

AfroPunk’s homecoming

Thousands of people attended the first AfroPunk festival to be held on the continent. The celebration of alternative black culture was held in the South African city of Johannesburg recently.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

The festival describes itself as “a blank space to freak out in, to construct a new reality, to live your life as you see fit, while making sense of the world around you”.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

For years the festival has been a space for Africans in the diaspora to explore their heritage. So some described its first appearance in Africa as a homecoming.

AfroPunk was first held in New York in 2005, and was started by people who felt marginalised by both mainstream black and pop cultures. They drew heavily on the rebellious spirit of punk.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

It has since become a global movement, and has been held in Atlanta, Paris and London.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

The festival celebrates music and culture “born of African spirit”, as well as alternative music and fashion. It has become synonymous with eclectic, experimental outfits and style.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

There was some controversy on the first day after South African DJ Cleo pulled out, claiming local artists were not being treated with the same respect as international ones. But that didn’t seem to stop music-lovers dancing to both legendary old and popular new South African musicians, including Kwaito star Thebe, below. Kwaito music developed in South Africa in the early 1990s.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

Traditional healer, artist and activist Albert Ibokwe Khoza, below, accompanied The Brother Moves On for their carnivalesque performance.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

International artists, including British performer Laura Mvula, below, and American Anderson .Paak kept festival-goers entertained on day two. US star Solange was meant to be the headline act but she cancelled due to sickness. Some say the AfroPunk movement has become a victim of its own popularity, and has become mainstream.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

Pride in black hair, beauty and fashion were all on display, in keeping with the themes of the festival.

The festival also champions inclusion of people of all backgrounds, ethnicities and sexual orientations. Screens flashing the messages rejecting ableism, sexism, homophobia and racism were on display throughout the festival.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

Art was also created – Gloria Shoki, below, urged others to join her painting a graffiti mural.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

For 29-year-old performance artist and poet Thola Antamu, below, this was a chance to dress up in her most regal attire.

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Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi

See more photo galleries from across Africa

The new generation of African designers

Madagascar’s love affair with vintage French car

Kenyan fashionista dares to stand out in Kibera slum

The tattoos Eritreans get before they leave for Europe

The street child who became a top photographer

Artists take over Ghana’s streets

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42546615

No-go to hot spot

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Melissa Lyttle

The Samalayuca sand dunes are considered one of Mexico’s best-kept secrets. With their stunning views and endemic vegetation, they have plenty of potential to attract tourists, nature lovers and sand boarders. But their location, just 50km (30 miles) south of Ciudad Juárez, means few venture out here as many are put off by the Mexican city’s high murder rate.

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Melissa Lyttle

In 2010, the city on the Mexico-US border broke the record for the highest homicide rate ever recorded, with some 10 people killed on average every day. While the number of homicides has gone down, Ciudad Juárez has struggled to shake its reputation as a highly violent city.

But for locals, the sand dunes have always been an oasis where they find respite and have fun.

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Melissa Lyttle

They are part of the Chihuahuan Desert, the largest in North America, and the dunes occupy an area of 2,000 sq km, a third of which was declared a protected area in 2009.

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Melissa Lyttle

Others come to the dunes for extreme sports.

Tony Reyes, 22, first visited when he was a child with his family and friends. He is part of a racing team which comes to practise off-road driving for tournaments that take place in the area every couple of months.

“What I like most about doing off-road in Samalayuca is the calm of the desert,” Mr Reyes says.

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Melissa Lyttle

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Melissa Lyttle

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Melissa Lyttle

The dunes are located along El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior), a 2,560km-long trade route between Mexico City and Santa Fe, the capital of the US state of New Mexico.

For many centuries before the arrival of the Spanish conquerors, indigenous nomads moved up and down the trail hunting and gathering useful plants.

The petroglyphs, or rock carvings, found in Samalayuca are a legacy of the early inhabitants of the area. The images date back 1,500 years and depict wild animals including horned sheep, stars and people.

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Melissa Lyttle

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Melissa Lyttle

The Spanish discovered the trail in the 16th Century and used it to reach the area where they eventually founded Santa Fe. After that, the route became fundamental for missionaries and colonisers and to transport goods and merchandise.

Centuries later, the dunes were used as a setting for several films, including Conan the Destroyer, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, and David Lynch’s Dune.

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Melissa Lyttle

Javier Meléndez is a local farmer who is now undersecretary for rural development of the northern area of Chihuahua state. During the most violent years in Ciudad Juárez, he served as mayor of the town of Samalayuca, just off the dunes.

A local celebrity, he has never shied away from addressing the difficulties of his region.

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Melissa Lyttle

In 2014, a Canadian-Mexican copper company came to the area, interested in exploiting the high silica content of the sands.

Mr Meléndez was initially in favour of the project, hoping it would drive down the area’s high unemployment rates.

But environmentalists were opposed, saying it would destroy its delicate biodiversity and put at risk the few sources of water.

Eventually, Mr Meléndez came to oppose it as well. Modern techniques of desert irrigation have made the cultivation of zucchinis and other vegetables possible, creating more employment in the agricultural sector.

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Melissa Lyttle

Moreover, local tourism is growing. Some residents of Ciudad Juárez have bought weekend homes in the area to enjoy the calm surroundings.

“Now we favour tourism as a strategic area for the local economy,” says Mr Meléndez.

“We want to build our future as people of the desert, who are aware of the environment they live in.”

Irene Caselli and Melissa Lyttle were in Samalayuca thanks to a grant from the International Women’s Media Foundation.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-42541672

Africa in pictures: 30 December 2017-4 January 2018

A selection of the best photos from across and about Africa this week:

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AFP

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Onlookers are awed during New Year celebrations in Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe…

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AFP

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The concert at Victoria Falls Farm School ended a three-day carnival in the resort town…

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AFP

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Cheers break out in Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, after crowds count down to the New Year at an event at the Kenyatta International Convention Centre…

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AFP

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In South Africa, the mobile phones are out to capture the New Year fireworks in Johannesburg’s Mary Fitzgerald Square…

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EPA

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Earlier on Sunday in the South African city of Cape Town, men play out the old year at sunset to the crowds on Scarborough beach…

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Reuters

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The next day, South Africans flock to Durban beach to bathe and welcome 2018…

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AFP

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It was religious cleansing for the followers of South Africa’s Nazareth Baptist Church, also known as Shembe, during their ceremony on Sunday ahead of a pilgrimage to the mountain of Nhlongakazi north of Durban.

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EPA

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On Tuesday, people dress up for Cape Town’s Minstrels Carnival, which dates back to the era when slaves in the Cape Colony were given the day after New Year off.

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Reuters

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It is New Year see-sawing for children in a park in Nigeria’s capital, Abuja, on Monday.

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AFP

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On Wednesday, stewardesses of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti Railway pose after the arrival of the first commercial train from the Ethiopian capital at platform at Djibouti’s Nagad station.

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EPA

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On the same day, Eritrean refugees smoke water pipes at a makeshift cafe outside the Holot detention facility near Nitzana in the Negev Desert along Israel’s border with Egypt.

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Reuters

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On Sunday, Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir arrives to address the nation at the palace in the capital, Khartoum, on the 62nd anniversary of the country’s independence.

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EPA

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It is good to see Liberia’s “Daily Talk” chalkboard paper is still going – here people on New Year’s Eve in the capital, Monrovia, read final results of the run-off elections which saw ex-footballer George Weah winning the presidency.

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AFP

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And on the same day, a small herd of cows is pictured taking a break on the sands of the Tanzanian island of Zanzibar.

Images courtesy of AFP, EPA, PA, Reuters and Getty Images

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-42570173